Manufacturing Dissent Since 1996
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Danny Danny Danny Thompson. This is for you, Till Eulenspiegel! How can I go on without you? How can the universe go on? You were always latent in it, you emerged and made it yours, and now you’ve gone from it. What function can it possibly serve now, greater than to bring you to us?

In a Moment of Truth, Jeff Dorchen honors Danny Thompson, A Legend of The Arts gone too soon.

Read the transcript here

 


Posted by Alexander Jerri
956lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 1:00PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM / stream at www.thisishell.com / subscribe to the podcast

 

9:15 - Live from London, Richard Seymour examines Corbyn's rise and a new path for the British left.

Richard wrote the op-ed Corbyn: shifting the possible for the Times Literary Supplement and the essay Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Centre for Salvage.

 

10:05 - Writer Andrea Flynn explains why a class-only politics fails to deliver justice for women of color.

Andrea wrote the report Justice Doesn’t Trickle Down: How Racialized and Gender Rules are Holding Women Back for the Roosevelt Institute.

 

10:35 - Jacobin's Nicole Aschoff charts the downward prospects of Whole Foods-style conscious capitalism.

Nicole wrote the Guardian op-ed Whole Foods represents the failures of 'conscious capitalism.'

 

11:10 - Writer Angela Nagle surveys the dark politics of mass hatred, from Malthus to Pepe.

Angela wrote the Baffler article Enemies of the People and is the author of the soon to be released Kill All Normies, which we'll talk about with her in a few weeks.

 

12:05 - Journalists Maureen Mitra and Candice Bernd explore the toxic (literally) state of mass incarceration.

Maureen and Candice are co-authors of the Truthout / Earth Island Journal report America's Toxic Prisons: The Environmental Injustices of Mass Incarceration.

 

12:45 - In a Moment of Truth, Jeff Dorchen ponders our destiny, such as it is. Or might be.

Jeff wasn't super clear about this one.

 

May 27 2017
Posted by Alexander Jerri

On This Day in Rotten History...

In 1962 – (55 years ago) – in Centralia, Pennsylvania, a fire set deliberately to clear trash out of an underground landfill ignited an ancient coal seam in a nearby abandoned mine. The coal fire gradually spread underneath the town and became a threat to public health and safety. It created dangerous sinkholes, spewed sulfur smoke and carbon monoxide from openings in the ground, and defied all attempts to put it out. By 1984 a mass exodus from the town began, and in 1992, all real estate properties were officially condemned. Centralia, Pennsylvania, once home to a thousand people, is now a ghost town. Nothing remains there but a few derelict buildings and a crumbling network of empty streets covered with graffiti by curious visitors. In some places the ground is still hot to the touch, and cracks in the earth belch poisonous smoke from an underground fire that, experts say, could continue burning for another two hundred years.

In 1971 – (46 years ago) – in the district of Pabna in East Pakistan, units of Pakistan army troops and paramilitaries massacred more than two hundred unarmed members of the local Hindu minority. The killings were a part of Operation Searchlight, a military campaign meant to suppress a Bengali nationalist movement in what was then East Pakistan. Ever since the partition of India after independence in 1947, the new and predominantly Muslim nation of Pakistan had consisted of two sections or “wings” more than a thousand miles apart, with the massive territory of India in between. The two parts of the country had their religious, cultural, and political differences, and as an independence movement grew in East Pakistan, the national government in the West launched a systematic campaign of genocide that led to all-out war, in which India joined on the side of the separatist East. After nine months of air strikes, mass murder, rape, and other atrocities, the war ended with East Pakistan proclaiming itself the newly independent nation of Bangladesh. Body counts vary, but most researchers believe that the war killed about half a million people, and created some thirty million refugees.

Rotten History is written by Renaldo Migaldi

Posted by Alexander Jerri
954lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 12:00PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM / stream at www.thisishell.com / subscribe to the podcast

 

9:15 - Law scholar Michael J. Glennon examines Trump's battle with the national security state.

Michael wrote the June cover story Security Breach: Trump’s tussle with the bureaucratic state for Harper's.

 

10:05 - Live from Sáo Paulo, Brian Mier reports on the massive resistance movement sweeping post-coup Brazil.

Brian wrote the article Brasilia 24/5: A View from the Ground for Brasilwire.

 

10:35 - Gay Liberation Network's Andy Thayer explores Gay Inc.'s mainstreaming of LGBTQ politics.

Andy wrote the article The LGBTQ Movement is an Intersectional Fail for Counterpunch.

 

11:05 - Geographer Andrew Brooks explains how the Western development agenda expands global poverty.

Andrew wrote the book The End of Development: A Global History of Poverty and Prosperity for Zed Books.

Episode 953

Next October

May 22 2017
Posted by Alexander Jerri

Krauthammer and Sickle

Welcome to the Moment of Truth: the thirst that is the drink.

Fox News Channel chattering skull Charles Krauthammer is off the chain and skating on the slippery slope toward socialism.

Back when we were hunting and gathering in small tribes, we didn't have much, but what we had we shared. We never let anyone go hungry or homeless who was in the tribe. And you had to do something pretty severe to get kicked out. It wasn't until we had a large surplus that we began starving people. Now, it could be said that these people we've been starving since we developed the ability not to starve anyone aren't members of our tribe. However, ethically, we've come to the conclusion that all people are human beings and worthy of every chance to live. Of course there's a sizeable minority of racist, nationalist, and religious fanatics who think anyone not like them should die. But for the most part, humanity is leaning toward including all of humanity and even some other beings in the "in" group.

And yet somehow, we're starving people. We're allowing people to go without medical treatment for permanently damaging or even fatal ailments. We're shortchanging them on education. We're shortchanging them on opportunity.

Just to review: when we barely had enough, we shared. Now that we have way more than enough, we allow a few a-holes to hoard a ridiculous surplus that could save lives.

We are slaves. If that offends anyone because it trivializes actual slavery, I'm sorry, but I don't mean this metaphorically. In the future, should we be fortunate enough to have one, people will wonder how we could stand it, having the basic necessities of survival denied us, held hostage, only provided to us on condition of our servitude. Obviously there are other ways to look at our condition, but when a small handful of idiotically privileged people skate merrily about in solid gold ice rinks or sip heroin tea in which they've poached the last embryonic platypus while toxically polluting more land than all the farmers in the world could farm, land that could be filtering pollution and hosting herds of cool megafauna, while the vast majority of people are either forced to work at unfulfilling, monotonous, spirit-killing, or even dangerous jobs, or to beg, or to pick weeds out of the desert gravel in order not to starve – what do you call that? You call that freedom?

There's this idea that if you create the basis... read more

Posted by Alexander Jerri
953lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 12:45PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM / stream at www.thisishell.com / subscribe to the podcast

 

9:05 - Writer China Miéville explains what Russia, 1917 can teach the post-Soviet, pre-revolutionary world.

China is author of October: The Story of the Russian Revolution from Verso.

 

10:00 - Military whistleblower Lisa Ling reports on life and death inside the secret US drone war.

Lisa, a former technical sergeant on drone surveillance systems, was profiled in the documentary National Bird.

 

11:00 - Journalist Duff McDonald tours the school at the golden heart of global capitalism.

Duff is author of the new book The Golden Passport: Harvard Business School, the Limits of Capitalism, and the Moral Failure of the MBA Elite from Harper Collins.

 

12:00 - Organizer Mariame Kaba looks beyond reform, to the destruction of the prison industrial complex.

Mariame wrote the article Free Us All: Participatory defense campaigns as abolitionist organizing for The New Inquiry.

 

12:45 - In a Moment of Truth, Jeff Dorchen yanks your physical and mental chains.

 

 

Episode 952

Human Consumption

May 13 2017
Posted by Alexander Jerri

 The Moral Bankruptcy of Nations

Welcome to the Moment of Truth: the thirst that is the drink.

Adam Smith didn't invent capitalism. I know this, not because I've read The Wealth of Nations, but because I had PJ O'Rourke read it to me. And I fell asleep. A lot. Because PJ's voice, while very like the punctuated drone of a band saw suffering sporadic power outages in a thunderstorm, cloaked me in its jaggedness, like thunder in a thunderstorm, and soothed me just because I knew it was there, like a stern God, whether I was paying attention or not.

Scottish philosophers fall into two camps: those who shag sheep, and those who don't. Adam Smith was by all accounts a non-sheep-shagging Scotsman. It doesn't seem like he shagged anything or anybody. No judgment there. If I were a homosexual Scottish philosopher in the 18th Century I would probably keep it to myself, or even keep it from myself. I'm not saying Smith was gay, I'm saying if I were a gay 18th-century Scottish philosopher, I mean, if I were in his shoes – those shiny black slippers with the silver buckles and those saucy white knee-socks – I wouldn't confront my sexuality at all. I'd just hang out with my mother a lot.

Mr. Smith had a utopian project: to examine a world in which a great deal was cruel and wrong and describe it as a world in which everything was on course to be as it should. Smith did not invent capitalism, but rather described an ideal version of it. That's my take-away, and remember, I'm notorious for maliciously misunderstanding the work of those of superior mentality, which includes everyone of any consequence. This essay will be no exception. It's already too late for this essay to be an exception.

In the century before Smith wrote his magnum opus, Rene Descartes, a fancy-pants Frenchman who wore big shirt-collars that extended down to his tits, took on the project of doubting everything. I judge Descartes harshly on one point, and that is when he abdicated his doubt for an invented God. He didn't invent God, he just used an old one someone else had invented to bridge the gap between godless mystery and the fact that existence itself exists. He was so close to discovering the meaninglessness of existence, but just as he was about to dig it up, he put the shovel down and said, "Well, somebody made all this dirt I'm digging around in. Let's just leave it at that."

A similar abdication is where I judge Smith (as... read more

Posted by Alexander Jerri

On This Day in Rotten History...

In 1972 – (45 years ago) – in Osaka, Japan, a fire at the Sennichi Department Store killed 118 people. The fire started in the dress department and quickly spread to other areas in the building that were being remodeled, where burning construction materials filled the stairwells with poisonous fumes. The building had no fire sprinklers. In a nightclub on the seventh floor, patrons found the fire exits locked, and in desperation they began jumping from the windows. It took firefighters three days to put out the blaze. Ninety-six people were found dead inside the nightclub, twenty-two died from jumping, and another seventy-eight were injured, including twenty-seven firefighters. Three managers of the building later went to prison for criminal negligence and accidental homicide.    

In 1985 – (32 years ago) – Philadelphia police bombed the headquarters of MOVE, a radical commune that advocated black liberation and shunned modern technology. The group was well stocked with guns and ammo, and nine members had already gone to prison for third-degree murder in the death of a cop. The group occupied a row house in West Philadelphia, where neighbors complained to the police about their rooftop bullhorn political speeches. When police arrived and were denied entry, they resorted to fire hoses and tear gas, and were answered with bullets. The resulting shootout led to a two-day armed standoff, which ended when a state police helicopter dropped two one-pound bombs on the house, sparking a fire that quickly spread across the neighborhood. With orders to hold off, firefighters stood by and watched the police gun down commune members who came running out of the burning house. Eleven people, including five children, were killed; some sixty-five houses were destroyed; and more than 250 people were left homeless. Eleven years later, a federal jury found that the city had used excessive force and violated the Fourth Amendment. It ordered payment of $1.5 million to three commune survivors, and Philadelphia briefly became known as “The City That Bombed Itself.” Mayor Wilson Goode issued a formal apology, but nobody in the city government was ever criminally charged.

Rotten History is written by Renaldo Migaldi