Manufacturing Dissent Since 1996
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910maxzirngast

The more allies Erodgan loses in the state apparatus - and now 60,000 people in a couple days - the more he has to rely on radical groups on the street to secure his power. And that is where the real danger lies.

Live from Ankara, journalist Max Zirngast gives context to the recent coup attempt in Turkey beyond the widely reported secular / Islamic divide - pointing instead towards larger trends of political and economic instability amidst a wave of popular uprisings, open (and covert) conflict between Erogan and the Gülen movement, and a populace united against military rule, but fractured by war, religious radicalism and Erdogan's creeping authoritarianism.

Max is co-author of the Jacobin article What Happened in Turkey?

 


Episode 910

Crash the State

Jul 23
Posted by Alexander Jerri

On This Day in Rotten History...

On this day in 1942 – (74 years ago) – the Bulgarian poet Nikola Vaptsarov, who wrote in his spare time while working as an industrial and railroad mechanic, was executed by firing squad for his role in organizing supplies of weapons and documents for the underground communist resistance against the rule of the Bulgarian Tsar Boris III, who allowed Nazi forces to pass through Bulgaria on their way to invading the Soviet Union. Aside from publishing his work in newspapers and writing several plays, Vaptsaraov only produced one actual book of poetry, entitled Motoring Songs, published in 1940. In spite of his small output, he’s remembered today in Bulgaria and Macedonia as an important revolutionary voice, and as a peer and counterpart to Bertolt Brecht and Federico García Lorca. His poetry draws on Bulgarian folk traditions to critique dominant versions of history and emphasize the unsung labors of common people in shaping the achievements of society. He was 34 years old when he was arrested by the fascists and shot.

On this day in 1967 – (49 years ago) – in Detroit, citizens’ spontaneous resistance to a police raid of an unlicensed after-hours bar quickly escalated into one of the deadliest and most destructive urban riots in US history. Though Detroit had been cited positively for a degree of progress in education and employment for African Americans that looked better than the situation in some other American cities, its population still harbored resentment over poverty, housing discrimination, poor policing, and other large-scale manifestations of racism. These long-simmering grievances erupted in a wave of violence, arson, and looting that spread across the city’s West Side and continued for almost a week. Not only did Michigan Governor George Romney (father of Mitt) call in the National Guard, but President Lyndon Johnson decided to mobilize the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions into the inner city to restore order. By the time the rioting died down, 43 people were dead, almost 350 were seriously injured, and some 1,400 buildings had gone up in flames. Coleman Young, who was elected Detroit’s mayor in 1974, would later write of the ’67 riots that they “put Detroit on the fast track to economic desolation.”

On this day in 1983 – (33 years ago) – Air Canada Flight 143, a Boeing 767 jetliner cruising at 41,000 feet en route from Montreal to Edmonton with 61 passengers aboard, suddenly and without warning ran out of fuel. The mishap was later attributed to a chain of miscalculations and misunderstandings by Montreal ground personnel and the airplane’s crew as a result of Air Canada’s transition from the imperial system of weights and measures to the metric system. When the engines went out in midflight, the airplane also lost hydraulic power for its control surfaces and landing gear. With no official training for such a mishap, the captain was forced to draw on his experience as a recreational glider pilot, letting gravity drop the wheels, and guiding the airliner to a dead-stick landing at the only available site: a racetrack and drag strip near Gimli, Manitoba, where an auto rally was in progress. As the unpowered airliner approached silently, the spectators noticed it only at the last moment and ran terrified in all directions asit came in for a very rough landing. Incredibly, there were no major injuries. Later, the crew had the odd distinction of being both awarded for landing the plane safely and punished for allowing the snafu to happen in the first place.

Rotten History is written by Renaldo Migaldi

Posted by Alexander Jerri
910lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 1PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM / stream at www.thisishell.com / subscribe to the podcast

 

9:10 - Live from Turkey, journalist Max Zirngast explains why the coup attempt happened, and why it failed.

Max is co-author of the Jacobin article What Happened in Turkey.

 

10:05 - Latin America specialist Julia Buxton examines Venezuelan politics and the fate of Chavismo after Chávez.

Julia was interviewed in the piece Venezuela After Chávez at New Left Review.

 

10:35 - Writer Jacquelin Kataneksza profiles #ThisFlag and the emergence of protest movements across Zimbabwe.

Jacquelin wrote the article Fed up and not afraid! for Africa is a Country.

 

11:05 - Journalist Douglas Gillison uncovers America's global network of foreign police and military training.

Douglas is co-author of the 100 Reporters investigation Training the Planet: America’s Vast Global Network to Instruct Foreign Security Forces Gets Scant Oversight.

 

12:05 - Alex S. Vitale and Brian Jordan Jefferson outline the rise of 'command and control' policing in New York City.

Alex and Brian wrote the chapter "The Emergence of Command and Control Policing in Neoliberal New York" for the Verso collection Policing the Planet: Why the Policing Crisis Led to Black Lives Matter.

 

12:40 - In a Moment of Truth, Jeff Dorchen parses a popular political podcast.

He won't tell me whether it's Chapo Trap House but I think it's probably not.

 

Posted by Alexander Jerri

Here's what Chuck is reading to prepare for Saturday's show:

What Happened in Turkey -  Guney Işıkara, Alp Kayserilioğlu and Max Zirngast [Jacobin]

Venezuela After Chávez - Julia Buxton [New Left Review]

Fed up and not afraid! - Jacquelin Kataneksza [Africa is a Country]

Training the Planet: America’s Vast Global Network to Instruct Foreign Security Forces Gets Scant Oversight - Douglas Gillison, Nick Turse and Moiz Syed [100 Reporters]

The Emergence of Command and Control Policing in Neoliberal New York from Policing the Planet chapter from Policing the Planet: Why the Policing Crisis Led to Black Lives Matter - Alex S. Vitale and Brian Jordan Jefferson [Verso Books]

Episode 909

20 Years in Hell

Jul 16
Posted by Alexander Jerri

On This Day in Rotten History...

On this day in 1683 – (333 years ago) – on the southern coast of what is now Taiwan, the Chinese admiral Shi Lang arrived with a fleet of 600 warships and 100,000 men to invade the kingdom of Tungning, which ruled the southwestern part of the island, and claim it for the Qing dynasty. The Tungning defense forces fought hard, but they were fatally outnumbered and outgunned by the Chinese, who used Dutch-manufactured cannons to bombard the shore while 60,000 Chinese soldiers disembarked, made their way to the Tungning capital, burned it down, and forced its leaders to surrender. Some 10,000 to 15,000 soldiers and sailors on both sides died in the battle, which marked the permanent demise of the Tungning kingdom.

On this day in 1942 – (74 years ago) – in a large coordinated operation, police in Paris, acting under the direction of Nazi Germany and France’s collaborationist Vichy government, spread out over the city and quickly rounded up and arrested more than 13,000 Jewish people, including more than 4,000 children, and herded them into a bicycle racing arena without adequate food, water, or sanitary facilities. The prisoners were soon loaded onto trains and sent to the concentration camp at Auschwitz. It was just one of many operations in the Nazis’ larger plan to exterminate the Jewish population of Europe in the 1940s.

On this day in 1945 – (71 years ago) – in the deserts of New Mexico, US Army scientists of the Manhattan Project, led by J. Robert Oppenheimer, conducted the world’s first detonation of a nuclear weapon. The atomic bomb test, codenamed “Trinity,” produced an explosion equivalent to 20,000 tons of TNT, which was two to three times more powerful than the scientists had expected. The mushroom cloud rose more than seven miles high, and the shock wave could be heard 100 miles away. In spite of the remote desert location, the bright flash and enormous explosion of the top secret weapon were seen and heard by unsuspecting civilians. The Air Force issued its cover story in a press release, stating that it had been an accidental explosion in a remotely located ammunition magazine. A few weeks later, two more bombs of roughly similar explosive force were detonated over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, together killing an estimated 150,000 to 200,000 people.

Rotten History is written by Renaldo Migaldi

Posted by Alexander Jerri
909lineup

This is Hell! is celebrating 20 years of journalistic excellence by getting drunk at a bar after the show. Join us.

Listen live from 9AM - 1PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM / stream at www.thisishell.com / subscribe to the podcast

 

9:10 - Cultural critic Henry Giroux examines the endstage politics of Donald Trump.

Henry is author of the essay Anti-Politics and the Plague of Disorientation: Welcome to the Age of Trump for Truthout.

 

10:05 - Economist Dean Baker rethinks the financial sector in post-Brexit Europe.

Dean wrote the article Right-Sizing the Financial Sector in Post-Brexit Europe for Truthout.

 

10:35 - Peace activist Kathy Kelly connects America's violence abroad to the police war at home.

Kathy wrote the Consortiumnews article Of Lethal Drones and Police Shootings.

11:05 - Black Agenda Report's Glen Ford explores the state of Black resistance after Dallas.

Glen posted the article Rulers Shocked by Dallas Attack: Black Folks Keep on Stepping at Black Agenda Report.

 

11:35 - Civil rights attorney Flint Taylor surveys the municipal mechanisms of police impunity.

Flint is representing the family of Derek Williams, who died in the backseat of a Milwaukee police squad car in 2011.

 

12:05 - Historian Nicole Longpré traces six decades of far-right, anti-immigrant British politics.

Nicole wrote the article How the British Far Right Went Mainstream for Dissent.

 

12:40 - In a Moment of Truth, Jeff Dorchen finds a free lunch, and you'll never guess where!

Jeff will be in studio, hopefully not eating that lunch, for the whole show.

Posted by Alexander Jerri

Here's what Chuck is reading to prepare for Saturday's show:

Anti-Politics and the Plague of Disorientation: Welcome to the Age of Trump - Henry Giroux [truthout]

Right-Sizing the Financial Sector in Post-Brexit Europe  - Dean Baker [truthout]

Of Lethal Drones and Police Shootings - Kathy Kelly [Consortium News]

Sanders Supporters Need to Split or Get Off the Pot - Glen Ford [Black Agenda Report]

How the British Far Right Went Mainstream - Nicole Longpré [Dissent Magazine]

Episode 908

Labour Rattling

Jul 9
Posted by Alexander Jerri
908lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 1PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM / stream at www.thisishell.com / subscribe to the podcast

 

9:10 - Writer Richard Seymour explains how Jeremy Corbyn reclaimed the Labour Party for the left.

Richard is author of Corbyn: The Strange Rebirth of Radical Politics from Verso Books.

 

10:05 - Writer Sarah Kendzior points out the media's blindspot when covering young people.

Sarah wrote the article The myth of millennial entitlement was created to hide their parents’ mistakes for Quartz.

 

10:35 - Journalist Marcy Wheeler finds power and secrecy at play in Hillary's email scandal.

Marcy's most recent writing on the Clinton email hearings is Jim Comey, Poker Face, and the Scope of the Clinton Investigation(s) at her blog emptywheel.

 

11:05 - Writer Mark Danner explains how America lost its identity in the pursuit of endless war.

Mark is author of Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War from Simon & Schuster.

 

12:05 - Jordan Camp and Christina Heatherton explore the violent new dimension of policing in America.

Jordan and Christina edited the collection Policing the Planet: Why the Policing Crisis Led to Black Lives Matter from Verso Books.

 

12:45 - In a Moment of Truth, Jeff Dorchen taps the bottomless keg of situational paradox.

Oh hey speaking of kegs, Jeff will be in town for TIH!'s 20th anniversary party - see him IRL.