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1071richardhunsinger

The rich have relied on the cheaper labor populations that the nomadic proletariat have provided them for a while, and now that's starting to come into contact with their immediate political goals and how they retain power domestically. So these camps are starting to erect themselves as a way to capture the relative surplus population that is the migrant, and still be able to profit from it through the privatization mechanism - 72% of incarcerated migrants are held in privately owned camps.

Writer Richard Hunsinger sees the future of capitalism in America's migrant concentration camps - as an rotting empire tilts toward fascism, the incarceration of migrants becomes a source of value for capital, and the left must link the interests of all workers in all nations to resist a collapse into barbarism everywhere.

Richard wrote the article Holocaust Capitalism for Cosmonaut.

 


Posted by Alexander Jerri
882lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 1PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM or stream at www.thisishell.com

 

9:10 - Sociologist Linsey McGoey explains how capitalism profits from corporate philanthropy.

Linsey is author of No Such Thing as a Free Gift: The Gates Foundation and the Price of Philanthropy from Verso Books.

 

10:05 - Journalist Steve Horn reports on the details of a joint Obama-Exxon pipeline bill.

Steve posted the DeSmog Blog article During Paris Climate Summit, Obama Signed Exxon-, Koch-Backed Bill Expediting Pipeline Permits.

 

10:35 - The Radical Pessimist, Kevan Harris examines the domestic politics behind the Iran-Saudi Arabia feud.

Kevin will be working from his own research, plus that of several Middle East scholars he's boozed with.

 

11:05 - Cultural critic Henry Giroux explores the fear and violence at the heart of current American politics.

Henry is author of the new book America’s Addiction to Terrorism from Monthly Review.

 

12:05 - Journalist Shubhanga Pandey profiles the conflicts and contradictions facing Nepal's left.

Shubhanga wrote the Jacobin article The Next Nepali Revolution.

 

12:45 - Jeff Dorchen visits the Oregon militia standoff and finds something much dumber than white privilege.

Jeff will actually be responding to the lack of response, which we've all responded about enough already.

Posted by Alexander Jerri

Here is what Chuck is reading to prepare for Saturday's show:

No Such Thing as a Free Gift: The Gates Foundation and the Price of Philanthropy - Linsey McGoey [Verso]

Saudi Arabia’s Dangerous Sectarian Game - Toby Jones [New York Times Op-Ed]

During Paris Climate Summit, Obama Signed Exxon-, Koch-Backed Bill Expediting Pipeline Permits - Steve Horn [DeSmog Blog]

America’s Addiction to Terrorism - Henry Giroux [Monthly Review]

The Next Nepali Revolution - Shubhanga Pandey [Jacobin]

 

Episode 881

Chucklist 2015

Jan 2 2016
Posted by Alexander Jerri
881lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 1PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM or stream at www.thisishell.com

Chuck celebrates a new year of Hell by looking back at his favorite interviews of 2015

Episode 879

Full Scheme Ahead

Dec 19 2015
Posted by Alexander Jerri
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Hello This is Hell! weirdos,

Zurich correspondent Ed here with an important message about autonomous solidarity efforts along the Balkanroute in Europe.

As many of you may have seen in my Truthout piece about conditions for refugees in the Balkans (haha shameless plug), in the absence of any positive action among European governments or international NGOs, self-organized citizen initiatives have sprung up across the continent and have been scrambling to pick up the slack and prevent a humanitarian disaster the likes of which hasn't been seen on European soil since World War Two.

Though conditions along the route vary from country to country and from day to day, one thing has been constant so far: Serbia sucks. They haven't made the big headlines for their suckiness the way Hungary or Macedonia have, because they haven't put up big barbed-wire border fences (the Greek-Macedonian border was recently described to me by a well-traveled border security expert as the tightest and most aggressively patrolled he had ever seen).

But the Serbian authorities have played a much subtler game, the logic of which isn't entirely clear unless they are simply trying to wish away the refugees bottlenecked in their country by ignoring them out of existence meanwhile hiding them from public view. Because border controls on relief supplies coming into the country from the northwest have been so maddeningly strict, the improvised, extra-institutional solidarity organizations most active in the Balkans so far have all almost entirely given up. There are, after all, plenty of refugees in dire need elsewhere.

The organization I am working with in Switzerland, Stand Up For Refugees (SUFR), has worked some magic through fervent organizing and using the presence of citizens of the former Yugoslavia here to our advantage. We have scraped together the credentials necessary to transport relief supplies into Serbia and distribute them, and have the infrastructure necessary to house activists in the border town of Sid (pronounced "Shid," sorry FCC) and to warehouse regularly arriving shipments of donated winter clothing and camping equipment there as well.

Aid and solidarity will be delivered daily from there to the completely unattended, cold and desperate camp in Adasevci (pronounced a-DAH-shev-tsy) where thousands of Syrians, Afghans, Iraqis, Pakistanis, and sub-Saharan Africans are waiting for buses or trains over the border into... read more

Posted by Alexander Jerri
879lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 1PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM or stream at www.thisishell.com

 

9:10 - Ecologist Andreas Malm explores the links between fossil fuels and capitalism's 19th century explosion.

Andreas is author of Fossil Capital: The Rise of Steam Power and the Roots of Global Warming from Verso Books.

 

10:05 - Writer Ayesha Siddiqi explains why the West wants a Malala without the war.

Ayesha wrote the VICE essay Does America Deserve Malala?

 

10:35 - Attorney Vanessa Lucas reports on US complicity and profit from violence in the Philippines.

Vanessa co-wrote the Foreign Policy in Focus article The Philippine People Are Under Attack from Washington - and Their Own Government

 

11:05 - Journalist Michael Griffin rewrites a long history of Islamic State's short rise to power.

Michael is author of Islamic State: Rewriting History from Pluto Press.

 

12:05 - The Hopleaf's Michael Roper explain why industry mergers could mean less shelf space for craft beer.

Michael's 2015 Beer in Review will focus takeovers, fake breweries, craft bubbles and private equity.

 

12:45 - In 2015's last Moment of Truth, Jeff Dorchen torments the soul of a dead atheist.

Jeff's been mining the spirit world to end the year. Spooooky!

Posted by Alexander Jerri

Here is what Chuck is reading to prepare for Saturday's show:

Fossil Capital: The Rise of Steam Power and the Roots of Global Warming - Andreas Malm [Verso Books]

Does America Deserve Malala? - Ayesha Siddiqi [Vice]

The Philippine People Are Under Attack from Washington - and Their Own Government - Vanessa Lucas / Azadeh Shahshahani [Foreign Policy in Focus]

Islamic State: Rewriting History - Michael Griffin [Pluto Press]

 

Episode 878

Die Herd

Dec 12 2015
Posted by Alexander Jerri

On this day in the year 1098 – (917 years ago) – an army of several thousand European crusaders, who for weeks had laid siege to the town of Ma’arrat al-Numan in what is now Syria, managed to breach the town’s walls. Once inside, the crusaders negotiated a peace agreement with the town’s Muslim leaders. But as soon as the Muslims surrendered, the crusaders launched a massacre, killing some twenty thousand people. Taking control of the town, they found that it was not as rich or well supplied as they had assumed it would be, and the army’s two European leaders fell into a power struggle over control of what was there. Most of the other crusaders mounted their horses and left, proceeding onward to Jerusalem. But a smaller group stayed behind and was soon forced to deal with cold weather and lack of food. Driven mad by starvation after winter set in, the Europeans finally resorted to cannibalism—cutting up, boiling, grilling, and eating body parts of the Muslims they had killed.

On this day in 1899 – (116 years ago) – in Honolulu, Hawaii, a twenty-two-year-old bookkeeper named You Chong became the first person to die in what would quickly become a disastrous epidemic of bubonic plague. The disease was thought to have been brought to Hawaii from Hong Kong aboard the Japanese merchant vessel SS Nippon Maru, which had docked in Honolulu a few weeks earlier, carrying two human corpses and numerous rats infected with plague. As the usually fatal disease spread at first among Honolulu’s residents of Asian extraction, local authorities responded by cordoning off the city’s Chinatown and deliberately setting fire to allegedly plague-infected homes. One such fire went raging out of control, creating a conflagration that burned for seventeen days and destroyed some four thousand flimsy wooden houses. More than five thousand Chinatown residents were left destitute, and were marched off to hastily improvised sanitariums where they were kept under involuntary quarantine for months. Meanwhile, the plague continued spreading across the island of Oahu, eventually claiming more than sixty lives before burning itself out.     

On this day in 1933 – (82 years ago) – during an NHL hockey game between the Boston Bruins and the Toronto Maple Leafs, the legendary Boston defenseman Eddie Shore, hit by Toronto’s Red Homer, responded... read more