Manufacturing Dissent Since 1996
New interviews throughout the week
962gregpalast

It's just common names - but not common names for Republicans. James Brown, Jose Garcia, David Kim - these are common names, and what they have in common is they vote Democratic. If you're gonna remove people on the basis of a match of first name and last name - and that's it! - you're going to eliminate voters of color.

Investigative journalist Greg Palast reports on Crosscheck, the GOP's massive and extremely successful voter suppression apparatus - able to disenfranchise minorities for the simple crime of having first and last names, and previews the next stages of Kris Kobach's sophisticated revamp of Jim Crow era repression.

Greg's latest report is Sanders and Jackson join hands to take on Trump’s Vote Thief-in-Chief at his website, and his documentary on voter suppression, which was right all along, The Best Democracy Money Can Buy, is available on his website.

 


Posted by Alexander Jerri
957lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 1:00PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM / stream at www.thisishell.com / subscribe to the podcast

 

9:15 - Historian Nancy MacLean profiles the libertarian architect of the right's revolutionary plan for America.

Nancy is author of Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right's Stealth Plan for America from Viking Press.

 

10:00 - Live from Athens, anarchist Tasos Sagris discusses working within the gaps of austerity-era Greece.

Tasos is a member of the anarchist collective Void Network.

 

10:35 - Anthropologist Nazia Kazi examines class and complicity in an age of anti-Muslim surveillance.

Nazia wrote the article Against a Muslim Misleadership Class for Jacobin.

 

11:05 - Writer Peter Moskowitz explores the legal and corporate mechanisms of gentrification in America.

Peter is author of the new book How to Kill a City: Gentrification, Inequality, and the Fight for the Neighborhood from PublicAffairs.

 

12:05 - Sociologist Joshua Murray explains how capital manufactured Detroit's long decline.

Josh is co-author of the paper "Collateral Damage: How Capital’s War on Labor Killed Detroit" for the journal Catalyst.

 

12:45 - In a Moment of Truth, Jeff Dorchen goes in half-cocked on American gun culture.

You can't go full-cocked on the radio in our timeslot. Sorry.

Episode 956

Misanthropology

Jun 12
Posted by Alexander Jerri

 Our Story, So Far

Welcome to the Moment of Truth: the thirst that is the drink.

The reason I can't have nice things is that I will waste all my time watching TV on one of those nice things. This was proven to me once again while I was house/cat-sitting for some friends. Through exertion of will-power, expected neither by me nor anyone else, I actually did accomplish a great many things besides consuming motion picture entertainment. I did it by mostly watching particular movies one at a time, movies that I had a reason to watch, more specific than merely to have colors and sounds dancing for me in the room. I was selective, for the most part. And I avoided binging any series. I almost binged one, but an accident of fate spared me.

Trying to find something worth watching, I remembered someone mentioning they enjoyed an aspect of "Big Little Lies," the HBO limited series about a half-dozen women living in luxury but having all kinds of problems. And there was a murder, but the police couldn't seem to get to the bottom of it. It was a seven-episode series. I watched what I thought were the first three episodes and found it well-acted and somewhat intriguing. These women, though they were living in Malibu or Santa Monica or Santa Barbara or the Palisades, had problems just like the rest of us, serious and sad problems, problems that drove wedges between them or created bonds of confidence. Friendships, even.

The third episode was a relief because we found out which little boy had been assaulting Laura Dern's little girl, and it thankfully it wasn't the little boy we liked, whose mother was really too poor to live in the school district but wanted her kid to have the same chance as these over-privileged but really beautiful and winning Stepford children. Also, the sick wife-beating thread came to a head. The wife left her spouse, a separation it seemed was going to be a difficult thing to accomplish, and I was looking forward to all the tactics she would have to employ to keep her needy, violent husband at bay.

At least, until very near the ending. Then I realized I had watched the seventh episode instead of the third. But to be honest, it hardly mattered, except that it saved me four hours. Of what? Character and plot development? Those actresses were so good, I didn't really need anymore character work, and whatever fleshing-out the plot could've received was clearly unnecessary. The writers could... read more

Posted by Alexander Jerri
956lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 1:00PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM / stream at www.thisishell.com / subscribe to the podcast

 

9:15 - Live from London, Richard Seymour examines Corbyn's rise and a new path for the British left.

Richard wrote the op-ed Corbyn: shifting the possible for the Times Literary Supplement and the essay Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Centre for Salvage.

 

10:05 - Writer Andrea Flynn explains why a class-only politics fails to deliver justice for women of color.

Andrea wrote the report Justice Doesn’t Trickle Down: How Racialized and Gender Rules are Holding Women Back for the Roosevelt Institute.

 

10:35 - Jacobin's Nicole Aschoff charts the downward prospects of Whole Foods-style conscious capitalism.

Nicole wrote the Guardian op-ed Whole Foods represents the failures of 'conscious capitalism.'

 

11:10 - Writer Angela Nagle surveys the dark politics of mass hatred, from Malthus to Pepe.

Angela wrote the Baffler article Enemies of the People and is the author of the soon to be released Kill All Normies, which we'll talk about with her in a few weeks.

 

12:05 - Journalists Maureen Mitra and Candice Bernd explore the toxic (literally) state of mass incarceration.

Maureen and Candice are co-authors of the Truthout / Earth Island Journal report America's Toxic Prisons: The Environmental Injustices of Mass Incarceration.

 

12:45 - In a Moment of Truth, Jeff Dorchen ponders our destiny, such as it is. Or might be.

Jeff wasn't super clear about this one.

 

May 27
Posted by Alexander Jerri

On This Day in Rotten History...

In 1962 – (55 years ago) – in Centralia, Pennsylvania, a fire set deliberately to clear trash out of an underground landfill ignited an ancient coal seam in a nearby abandoned mine. The coal fire gradually spread underneath the town and became a threat to public health and safety. It created dangerous sinkholes, spewed sulfur smoke and carbon monoxide from openings in the ground, and defied all attempts to put it out. By 1984 a mass exodus from the town began, and in 1992, all real estate properties were officially condemned. Centralia, Pennsylvania, once home to a thousand people, is now a ghost town. Nothing remains there but a few derelict buildings and a crumbling network of empty streets covered with graffiti by curious visitors. In some places the ground is still hot to the touch, and cracks in the earth belch poisonous smoke from an underground fire that, experts say, could continue burning for another two hundred years.

In 1971 – (46 years ago) – in the district of Pabna in East Pakistan, units of Pakistan army troops and paramilitaries massacred more than two hundred unarmed members of the local Hindu minority. The killings were a part of Operation Searchlight, a military campaign meant to suppress a Bengali nationalist movement in what was then East Pakistan. Ever since the partition of India after independence in 1947, the new and predominantly Muslim nation of Pakistan had consisted of two sections or “wings” more than a thousand miles apart, with the massive territory of India in between. The two parts of the country had their religious, cultural, and political differences, and as an independence movement grew in East Pakistan, the national government in the West launched a systematic campaign of genocide that led to all-out war, in which India joined on the side of the separatist East. After nine months of air strikes, mass murder, rape, and other atrocities, the war ended with East Pakistan proclaiming itself the newly independent nation of Bangladesh. Body counts vary, but most researchers believe that the war killed about half a million people, and created some thirty million refugees.

Rotten History is written by Renaldo Migaldi

Posted by Alexander Jerri
954lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 12:00PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM / stream at www.thisishell.com / subscribe to the podcast

 

9:15 - Law scholar Michael J. Glennon examines Trump's battle with the national security state.

Michael wrote the June cover story Security Breach: Trump’s tussle with the bureaucratic state for Harper's.

 

10:05 - Live from Sáo Paulo, Brian Mier reports on the massive resistance movement sweeping post-coup Brazil.

Brian wrote the article Brasilia 24/5: A View from the Ground for Brasilwire.

 

10:35 - Gay Liberation Network's Andy Thayer explores Gay Inc.'s mainstreaming of LGBTQ politics.

Andy wrote the article The LGBTQ Movement is an Intersectional Fail for Counterpunch.

 

11:05 - Geographer Andrew Brooks explains how the Western development agenda expands global poverty.

Andrew wrote the book The End of Development: A Global History of Poverty and Prosperity for Zed Books.

Episode 953

Next October

May 22
Posted by Alexander Jerri

Krauthammer and Sickle

Welcome to the Moment of Truth: the thirst that is the drink.

Fox News Channel chattering skull Charles Krauthammer is off the chain and skating on the slippery slope toward socialism.

Back when we were hunting and gathering in small tribes, we didn't have much, but what we had we shared. We never let anyone go hungry or homeless who was in the tribe. And you had to do something pretty severe to get kicked out. It wasn't until we had a large surplus that we began starving people. Now, it could be said that these people we've been starving since we developed the ability not to starve anyone aren't members of our tribe. However, ethically, we've come to the conclusion that all people are human beings and worthy of every chance to live. Of course there's a sizeable minority of racist, nationalist, and religious fanatics who think anyone not like them should die. But for the most part, humanity is leaning toward including all of humanity and even some other beings in the "in" group.

And yet somehow, we're starving people. We're allowing people to go without medical treatment for permanently damaging or even fatal ailments. We're shortchanging them on education. We're shortchanging them on opportunity.

Just to review: when we barely had enough, we shared. Now that we have way more than enough, we allow a few a-holes to hoard a ridiculous surplus that could save lives.

We are slaves. If that offends anyone because it trivializes actual slavery, I'm sorry, but I don't mean this metaphorically. In the future, should we be fortunate enough to have one, people will wonder how we could stand it, having the basic necessities of survival denied us, held hostage, only provided to us on condition of our servitude. Obviously there are other ways to look at our condition, but when a small handful of idiotically privileged people skate merrily about in solid gold ice rinks or sip heroin tea in which they've poached the last embryonic platypus while toxically polluting more land than all the farmers in the world could farm, land that could be filtering pollution and hosting herds of cool megafauna, while the vast majority of people are either forced to work at unfulfilling, monotonous, spirit-killing, or even dangerous jobs, or to beg, or to pick weeds out of the desert gravel in order not to starve – what do you call that? You call that freedom?

There's this idea that if you create the basis... read more

Posted by Alexander Jerri
953lineup

Listen live from 9AM - 12:45PM Central on WNUR 89.3FM / stream at www.thisishell.com / subscribe to the podcast

 

9:05 - Writer China Miéville explains what Russia, 1917 can teach the post-Soviet, pre-revolutionary world.

China is author of October: The Story of the Russian Revolution from Verso.

 

10:00 - Military whistleblower Lisa Ling reports on life and death inside the secret US drone war.

Lisa, a former technical sergeant on drone surveillance systems, was profiled in the documentary National Bird.

 

11:00 - Journalist Duff McDonald tours the school at the golden heart of global capitalism.

Duff is author of the new book The Golden Passport: Harvard Business School, the Limits of Capitalism, and the Moral Failure of the MBA Elite from Harper Collins.

 

12:00 - Organizer Mariame Kaba looks beyond reform, to the destruction of the prison industrial complex.

Mariame wrote the article Free Us All: Participatory defense campaigns as abolitionist organizing for The New Inquiry.

 

12:45 - In a Moment of Truth, Jeff Dorchen yanks your physical and mental chains.